Workshops

"Our children did not only learn about art, culture, and cooking, but also about what it means to be a friend and part of a community."

-Elisa Van Voorhis, high school Spanish teacher and mother in Cambridge, MA

Workshops Available

1-Hour Workshop
Our one-hour workshops provide a lesson plan, resource list, worksheets that will focus on a particular region and/or culture. We have a variety of interdisciplinary lessons to choose from that can be used as one off experiences or in series. 
3-Hour Workshop
Our three hour curricula provides a more in depth exploration of a particular culture/region, will include a variety of activities/games, and recipes recommended to create with children if provided the space and equipment or to bring in for them to try. We also include book pages for children to make a keepsake booklet that documents their journey to share with family and friends.
Pop-Up Workshop
Our Pop-Up Workshops are created for large group settings: community and corporate events, all school events, festivals, book fairs, etc. The activities and materials are meant to serve a larger number of children in a shorter period of time.Rather than a created lesson, pop-up workshops focus on a specific activity, concept, or idea. Please contact us if you would like us to come and host your pop-up workshop. 

Lessons Available

Descriptions provided below are for our 3-hour programs. Our 1-hour and Pop-Up workshops are extracted from these programs. We are consistently working on new lessons and can also design specialized curricula upon request.

Soccer is a global sport. We believe it is also a global vehicle to greater intercultural communication. During this workshop we will read, The Soccer Fence: A Story of Friendship, Hope, and Apartheid in South Africa, written by Phil Bildner. Children will learn about the history of soccer along side apartheid and the life of Nelson Mandela.

During class we will journey to other regions in Africa as well: Burkina Faso, Kenya, and Uganda. We will explore how soccer looks different in developing regions when compared to the first world. We will also make a "stop" in Thailand to watch a short video sharing the story of the Panyee Soccer Team. The collaboration, perseverance, and innovation of this group of kids brought hope, joy, and unity to their community and will ignite curiosity, motivation, and creativity in our kids for the in class project.

Finally, children will be provided a limited variety of natural and recyclable materials to create their own soccer ball which we will put to use with soccer drills and scrimmaging. Let's see who's ball can hold up in the face of competition!

We believe that increased cultural empathy in youth will come with greater ease when children are provided authentic experiences to connect with peers in differing cultural and ethnic backgrounds. Cultured Kids is currently partnered with two communities: Foster Initiatives for Community Development in Uganda and The Upendo Program in Kenya.

These partnerships enable us to present pictures, video/audio content, and hand written letters from children in developing regions to children who are involved in our programs. This workshop in particular will focus on developing language arts and public speaking skills.

Children will be introduced to a child from one of these regions and then create a poster about this child that he/she will share with the class. Following our presentations children will have an opportunity to write back using a friendly letter format, story board format, or creative writing format.

One of the things that children will learn about from their peers in Uganda and Kenya is what their favorite food is. When provided the kitchen space we will make one of these items together and try it. The class will also get to fill out one of our culinary critiques. If we do not have the facility to make food, children will still have a chance to try food and critique it.

Aside from the benefit that these partnerships have for our elementary age students, they also contribute to the authenticity of our Kids Fund Kids, Project Based Learning Program.

The Nile River is one of the largest rivers in the world, coming in second to the Amazon River in South America. During this workshop we will journey with children from the base of the Nile River at Lake Victoria in Uganda to the large Delta in Egypt before emptying into the Mediterranean Sea.

While we will explore the various communities that the Nile feeds the workshop will largely focus on the importance of international cooperation when it comes to shared waterways. We will also touch on hydrology and climate change.

Our class will enjoy engineering their own waterways and dams out of lego's for testing. This activity will reinforce the material covered and will also challenge them to develop a structure that takes water containment, water flow, and tributaries into account. Once every child has successfully created their own individual waterway students will be challenged to connect all their waterways together. This will strengthen leadership skills, cooperation, and collaboration.

Finally, we will discuss the Nile Basin Initiative and the conflicts that can arise if all nations are not taken into account when considering dam engineering and/or hydropower structures. We will create our own dam out of legos on our giant waterway and see how it affects the flow of water and which children are impacted by the structure.

Lalibela, Ethiopia is home to 11 churches that were carved out of the earth itself, often refered to as "living rock". We often associate architectural engineering as an additive process, however this UNESCO World Heritage Site is a great example of a subtractive architectural process.

Part of this workshop will explore the history and development of these monolithic structures and another part will focus on the development and engineering of our own subtractive architectural piece. We will discuss form and function, challenge children to visualize pieces prior to getting started, and will also discuss the importance of creating balance, movement, and texture through the arts.

A little over 800 miles separates the southern most city in the world: Ushuaia, Argentina, and the Arctic Circle. Tierra del Fuego (Land of Fire) is the southern most province of Argentina that encompasses Ushuaia and also extends to a northern segment of Antarctica. Argentina's geographic location, footprint, and varying elevations yield one of the world's most biodiverse regions of the world.

This workshop will take children on a journey to various pockets of Argentina: Aconcagua and Laguna del Carbón, the highest and lowest points in Argentina (also the highest and lowest points in the Western and Southern Hemispheres) respectively. We will also explore the sub-tropics of Mesopotamia, the plains of Pampas, and glaciers in the Santa Cruz Province of Argentina. From the tip of Argentina we will journey to Argentina's occupied land in Antarctica.

Throughout our time together we will explore the regions biodiversity, discuss how geographic location can affect climate and culture, and (rather unrelated) eat empanadas. Our focused activity will provide children an opportunity to reflect on the diversity that surrounds them each day, whether in their home, school, community, etc. Then, they will be given supplies to create an artistic representation of their life through collage.

The Antarctic Treaty was signed by 12 nations on December 1 1959, today there are 53 representatives of the treaty. This workshop will explore the historical discovery of Antarctica, what a treaty is, and the Antarctic Treaty itself. We will challenge students to consider what life might look like in Antarctica and globally without the treaty and also encourage them to create connections in their own life.

Throughout our time together children will also be working in groups to create their own treaty, along with any symbolic representations they would like (flag, coat of arms, etc.). Each group will have an opportunity to share their treaty with the class. While we cannot think of any food that would be unique to this uninhabitable desert, we will enjoy some type of frozen treat while listening to class presentations.

Description for this Underwater Exploration on Whale Migration is coming soon!

Japan is an archipelago that is made up of 6,852 islands. However, during this workshop we will only be "touring" the four largest islands that make up 97% of its land area: Honshu, Hokkaido, Kyushu and Shikoku.We At each island station we will have a small group discussion and an activity.

While on Honshu we will learn about "The Way of Tea" in Japan. Aside from learning about the agricultural components to tea growth and distribution, we will learn about the history art ant of tea ceremony's. Then, on Kyushu we will host a tea ceremony and the children will be our guests. On Kyushu we will focus on geology and discuss how the land formation contributes to Japanese culture, making sure to explore some of the numerous active volcanoes and discuss Japan's location on "The Ring of Fire". Finally, on Shikoku we will turn our attention to geography rather than geology. We will take a birds eye view of the land and discuss how it came to be over time. At this station children will be challenged to discover how the Japan's geographic location has impacted the culture in Japan.

Whether we consider the Elephant Festival, the Holi Festival, the abundance of ornate saris and tunics, or the detailed architecture in India, we will see an array of bright and vibrant colors. This workshop will dive into each of these aspects of culture In India.

At the beginning of the workshop we will introduce the class to our friend Emi (Elephas Maximus Indicus), she is our painted elephant friend. Emi (pronounced em-ee) will be a part of our small group discussion and geographical exploration. During this time we will discuss cohabitation, the different elephant characteristics that EMI has compared to other elephants, and the fact that she is endangered.

Emi's painted exterior will provide a segue into the brightly colored Sari's and tunic's that we see on people and an introduction to our book, My Mother's Sari, by Sandhya Rao. The book choices and literature will vary depending on age group. We will end our group time playing some games with a Sari in class.

Following our group session we will "journey to the market to pick out their own color pigments, similar to those used in the Holi Festival that they will use to paint their own elephant. While our elephants are drying we will journey to the Meenakshi Temple in Tamil Nadu to examine the detailed sculptures and vibrant colors. Children will then be provided materials to create their own colorful architectural piece.

Rice production and distribution, the floating markets of Bangkok, and seafood are all topics that will be covered during this workshop. Children will go home with a new found knowledge and understanding of Rice Trivia. During class we will examine various common variety's and also make our own Sticky Rice with Mango.

We will move from the land to the water as we learn about the floating marketplace in Thailand. We will learn about the history of the market, the purpose of having these water markets, and also explore various food items that are sold and how food impacts culture.

Finally, we will challenge children to figure out what might be some of Thailand's primary food exports when considering their resources and geographic location and then take a look at where this export goes and how it can contribute to the transformation of another region's culture.

Children will leave with full bellies, a greater understanding of how our location affects our culture, some random rice trivia, and an increased global perspective.

What is a Fairy Tale? This is the question we ask children before getting started. The array of answers and thoughts help to get their creative minds going. In some cases children will share a fairy tale of their own, whether from memory or made up. This is encouraged!

This workshop will dig into a couple of Alexander Afanasyev's Russian Fairy Tales and also explore Russian Folk Music. Children will be challenged to create their own story or skit from a couple illustrations they are provided. In addition they will be challenged to transform their story or skit into song as well.

During the last portion of our workshop we will explore the Russian language and play a language game that will include Russian Nesting Dolls. Children will be challenged to think about why language is important, whether it can be lost, and how it can be used to develop greater intercultural understanding and respect.

Salvador Dalí was a strange dude! During class we will use the term eccentric and even play an eccentricity game to serve as a retrieval exercise after our lesson. While there are many Dalí pieces that are not appropriate for children we will take a look at some pieces that are: The Elephants, Spheres of Galletta, and Dalí Swans Reflecting Elephants to name a few.

This art movement will launch us into a conversation and exploration of our dreams. We will talk about the conscious vs. the subconscious and use a short video clip from Pixar's, Inside Out to bring this point home. During the video clip children will be able to try pinchosand will follow up the clip and snack with a Cultured Kids Culinary Critique.

Finally, we will provide supplies for children to create their own surrealistic masterpiece to take home.

Ireland is composed of The Republic of Ireland and Northern Ireland (part of the United Kingdom). During this workshop we will take a look at the population changes of Ireland over the past couple centuries, challenging students to serve as demographers. We will ask them to consider the dramatic dips and surges in the population and surmise possible causes for these dramatic changes.

One of the main themes through out the class will be a discussion on immigration. We will take a look at why people immigrate, how this movement can affect the region being left behind, the regions immigrants flock to, what social responsibility means, and how children can take part in being socially responsible.

Finally, we will introduce children to The Bridge of Tears, a monument in Ireland that serves as a reminder of the 1.5 million people who left during the potato famine. We will discuss the function of the bridge as well as the metaphor and have children engineer their own bridge our of pop sticks.

The term Impressionism was actually coined in jest when a critic, Louis Leroy, reviewed Monet's Impression Sunrise for the Persian newspaper, Le Charivari. While we will spend a good portion of our time working with children on a bit of color theory, the history and development of Impressionism, and also on their own Impressionistic painting that will mimic Monet's Haystack paintings, this class will also provide a grand example of how it is ok to go against the grain.

We use Monet's story to tap into the unique and creative side of each child. We encourage children to consider how hard it must have been for Monet to do what he loves despite the opposition; he was creating an entirely new art movement but he could not possibly have known then that it would be revered now.

Through Monet's example children are able to share areas of their life that are receiving opposition, are also encouraged to stand firm in who they are, and are empowered to believe that they have the ability to transform the world.

On this journey to Italy we will learn about the history and development of Opera. Children will be brought through a series of fun and mobile activities that will teach them about music; learning the difference between adagio, andante, and presto, forte, piano, and fortisimo. We will work with children on sharing their created story through Opera and will also introduce Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini to them. There will be a prize at the end for whoever can remember his full name!

Finally, we will also make and eat pasta (gluten free pasta can be available as well)! If we are not provided the space to make the pasta ourselves then we will just try pasta and provide everyone an opportunity to fill out one of out culinary critiques.

This workshop is a great option to provide in conjunction with our Knowing the Nile workshop. It is a great example of humanity's decision to cease dam construction for the sake of the people. The Côa Valley is home to a prehistoric rock art site in Northern Portugal that was discovered in the 1990's while constructing a dam. The dam project was not cancelled and rock art preserved until 1995.

While we can all appreciate the historical and aesthetic value of prehistoric rock art around the world not many have actually taken the time to consider the time and physical strength it would have taken to create it. During this workshop children will learn about varying strengths of metals and rocks. They will be able to use a tool to carve a brick to see how difficult it would have been. Once they have experienced the physical challenges that would have come from rock art we will give them some air dry clay to work with. They will create their own rock art and be provided dried pigments to accentuate their work.

The Cancún Underwater Museum consists of five hundred sculptures in three different galleries at the Cancún National Marine Park. Marine Park Director Jaime Gonzalez Canto and the primary sculptor Jason deCaires Taylor came up with the idea as a solution to decrease the damage that underwater reefs were experiencing due to the high volume of snorkelers. The underwater museum was created to provide a diversion from the routine snorkeling sites while also providing new territory for underwater life to cling to.

Before we introduce the museum to children we will have a discussion about our ecosystem and provide some tangible examples for them really understand the value in protecting all life on our home planet. After our discussion we will explain the conflict that the reefs in Mexico experiences and ask them to come up with some possible solutions. Following there input we will share the underwater museum with them.

This workshop is about the science of taste; sweet, sour, bitter, and salty, the history of corn and cocoa, monkeys, and Native Americans. Yes, you heard me correctly! Both chocolate and corn originated in modern day Mexico. We will take children on a journey to discover how each of these items became such a modern day staple in homes around the world.

For our chocolate exploration we will read No Monkeys, No Chocolate, written by Melissa Stewart and Allen Young. Children will try different types of chocolate with varying cocoa percentages to experience what cocoa may have tasted like when first discovered, and we will make our own word worm puppets to take home.

During our corn exploration children will play a game, learn about the invention (not discovery) of corn by the Native Americans, learn about and identify different varieties of corn, and press their own tortilla to take home.

Our CEO has a personal connection to lacrosse and she loves sharing this sport and many others in our workshops. During this program we will explore the history and meaning behind lacrosse, will read some excerpts from, Children of the Longhouse, but Joseph Bruchac, and discuss the long process that was required to create a lacrosse stick centuries ago.

Following our time of discussion and exploration we will learn about the modern day game, the difference between girls and boys lacrosse, and also spend some time learning how to cradle, pass, catch, and even scrimmage if we are provided the space.

There is a long, grueling, and expensive history behind the Expressionistic marvel of the Sydney Opera House. While we will happily share a clip of Finding Nemo for children to establish a connection to this architectural masterpiece, we will spend more time learning about what Expressionistic Architecture is, when it started, by whom, and what happened with this structure in particular.

This project will give children a look into the importance of cooperation, teamwork, and even failure in the work place and will encourage them to do the same. Aside from the visual art components we will also discuss the engineering aspect as well. During our activity children will be given a budget to purchase materials, asked to give an estimate of the time it will take to accomplish their structure, and then put into groups to work together on creating their own structure.

A description for this workshop exploring the Maori people in New Zealand and the performance art called Poi will be coming soon.

An in depth description on this workshop exploring wildlife and cohabitation in South America will be coming soon

Caño Cristales (also called the River of Five Colors, Liquid Rainbow, or Rainbow River) in Colombia is one of the most beautiful rivers in the world to visit in season (Aug - Nov). This workshop will explore the flora of the river and also the kettles that form in the river bed due to constant vortex of rocks that spin around in the water. We will do our own experiment to see if we can recreate the movement and the result in class.

We will then move from the smooth rocks that result from the kettles to a discussion on rocks in general. We will use starbursts for an activity that will teach children the difference between igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks. Finally, we will use alcohol inks to create our own river of five colors to take home.

A little over 800 miles separates the southern most city in the world: Ushuaia, Argentina, and the Arctic Circle. Tierra del Fuego (Land of Fire) is the southern most province of Argentina that encompasses Ushuaia and also extends to a northern segment of Antarctica. Argentina's geographic location, footprint, and varying elevations yield one of the world's most biodiverse regions of the world.

This workshop will take children on a journey to various pockets of Argentina: Aconcagua and Laguna del Carbon, the highest and lowest points in Argentina (also the highest and lowest points in the Western and Southern Hemispheres) respectively. We will also explore the sub-tropics of Mesopotamia, the plains of Pampas, and glaciers in the Santa Cruz Province of Argentina. From the tip of Argentina we will journey to Argentina's occupied land in Antarctica.

Throughout our time together we will explore the regions biodiversity, discuss how geographic location can affect climate and culture, and (rather unrelated) eat empanadas. Our focused activity will provide children an opportunity to reflect on the diversity that surrounds them each day, whether in their home, school, community, etc. Then, they will be given supplies to create an artistic representation of their life through collage.

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